Potterton Boiler E163 Fault Code


The Potterton fault code E163 heating NTC sensor Q & A or require an engineer for an emergency boiler repair.


The Potterton Boiler Fault Code E163 Error Common Q & A


Just below, we have a list of common questions relating to the E163 fault code on the Potterton boiler.

Potterton Boiler E163 Fault Code

  • What does the E163 fault code mean on my Potterton boiler?
  • If my boiler is displaying the E163 fault code, is it dangerous?
  • Is there a DIY fix for the NTC fault on my Potterton boiler?
  • What could be causing a sensing fault on my boiler?
  • The NTC sensor has power, so can it still be the cause of the E163 fault code being displayed?
  • If I need a new NTC heating sensor, should I replace my boiler?
  • My boiler engineer thinks it’s the wires and connections causing the issue, why would they fail?
  • My boiler is noisier than normal, could this have contributed to the E163 fault code on my Potterton boiler?
  • My boiler engineer thinks there has been water damage to electronic components, can this be fixed?
  • What is heating sludge, and how can this affect sensors on my heating system?
  • What can we do to get rid of heating sludge, and stop it occurring again?
  • My boiler engineer thinks it’s the PCB causing the E163 fault code to be displayed, does this seem right?
  • If I need a new PCB, how much is a replacement going to cost?

What does the E163 fault code mean on my Potterton boiler


If your boiler is displaying the E163 fault code on the display panel, it means there’s a sensing issue. Typically, the problem stems from a fault with the heating NTC sensor on your boiler. This is either not sensing temperature correctly, or is completely faulty.

If my boiler is displaying the E163 fault code, is it dangerous


The most dangerous faults are those relating to gas, especially when gas is being let into the boiler when there is no demand for it. It’s unlikely that the E163 fault code is dangerous. However, there’s a chance that your boiler may have locked out, before displaying the fault code. If this is the case, your boiler won’t work.

Is there a DIY fix for the NTC fault on my Potterton boiler


Unfortunately, there is no DIY fix for the NTC E163 fault on Potterton boilers. A lot of people try a reset, hoping to trick the boiler into thinking that the problem is fixed. But, this reset function is designed to be used after the problem is fixed, not before. As soon as the boiler’s printed circuit board notices that the NTC sensing fault is still occurring, it will display the E163 fault code and lock out.

Like all repairs on gas appliances, you’ll need to speak to a qualified Gas Safe boiler engineer. They’ll be able to find and fix the fault. Once they’ve done that, resetting the boiler will clear the fault code, and the boiler will operate again.

Like all repairs on gas appliances, you’ll need to speak to a qualified Gas Safe boiler engineer. They’ll be able to find and fix the fault. Once they’ve done that, resetting the boiler will clear the fault code, and the boiler will operate again.

What could be causing a sensing fault on my boiler


The first point of call for a boiler engineer, is to check the NTC heating sensor using a multi-meter. They’ll want to determine whether the component is at fault. They can test the sensor for power. If it’s not getting power, they’ll need to check it’s the component rather than wires and connections to it. To determine the root cause, each individual wire and connection will need to be tested.

The NTC sensor has power, so can it still be the cause of the E163 fault code being displayed


Lack of power makes the sensor an obvious culprit. However, if power is there, that doesn’t mean it’s not to blame. The next thing to check is that the resistance readings are correct. It could be that the NTC sensor is operational, but not feeding back the correct readings to the PCB. If this is the case, it’s likely that the boiler switches on and off when it shouldn’t.

Like testing for power, your Gas Safe boiler repair engineer will be able to test the NTC sensor, using a multi-meter.

If I need a new NTC heating sensor, should I replace my boiler


It rarely makes sense to replace the whole appliance, if it’s just a heating sensor that is causing an issue. Depending on the exact model of Potterton boiler you own, the fix could be as little as £100. Considering a new boiler is likely to cost more than £2,000, it makes much more sense to head for the cheap repair, rather than a boiler replacement.

My boiler engineer thinks it’s the wires and connections causing the issue, why would they fail


Your boiler is made up of lots of fragile electronic components, such as the heating sensor. The wiring and connections to and from these components are just as fragile. Typically, we find that internal boiler vibrations, alongside water damage, are the most common killers.

My boiler is noisier than normal, could this have contributed to the E163 fault code on my Potterton boiler


Noisy boilers need to be attended to straight away. In the case of the E163 fault code, it’s likely that excess noise, has led to excess vibrations. And, it’s these vibrations that are going to cause connections to come loose, and possibly contribute to long-term damage.

More importantly, noisy boiler components are likely going to lead to expensive repair bills if they’re not attended to quickly.

For instance, the excessive noise could be something like the boiler’s pump. The bearings on the shaft could be worn. Attended to now, the bearings could simply be replaced. But, if left, it could lead to you needing a pump replacement, not to mention the vibrations causing damage to all other electronic components in your boiler.

My boiler engineer thinks there has been water damage to electronic components, can this be fixed


Like boiler vibrations, water damage is common. Again, it’s the pump that’s the biggest culprit here. Over time, the seals on the pump will wear. If they start weeping, the moisture is going to drip on electronic components, and that’s going to cause damage.

And, just like boiler vibrations, you’ll want to get boiler leaks fixed as soon as possible. The longer they’re left, the more likely they’re going to cause damage to a whole host of components.

What is heating sludge, and how can this affect sensors on my heating system


Whenever we see problems with temperature sensors on boilers, there’s a chance that heating sludge is to blame.

Heating sludge is a build-up of iron oxide (rust). That comes from the inside of radiators, towel rails and even copper pipes. The longer it’s left, the bigger the build-up.

As this rust breaks off and starts circulating around the heating system, it can get lodged in boiler components, such as the heat exchanger or pump. This can restrict the flow of water, causing water to overheat (the flow pipe too hot) and water to circulate too slowly (the return pipe is too cold).

And, there are various sensors in the boiler that recognise this. When the flow pipe gets too hot, or the temperature differential between the flow and return is too high, the boiler will lock out.

But, the damage doesn’t stop there. Sludge and limescale can ruin pumps, crack heat exchangers and even stop radiators from working. So, if you suspect heating sludge in your system, it’s a wise idea to get it sorted as soon as possible.

What can we do to get rid of heating sludge, and stop it occurring again


The first thing to ask your engineer to do, is to flush out your heating system; this gets rid of most heating sludge. We’d always advise a hot flush, rather than a power flush, as a power flush can lead to leaks occurring on weak central heating systems.

Once you’ve had the system flushed, it’s time to put measures in place to stop heating sludge building up again. The most common preventative measure is to use central heating inhibitor (to break down heating sludge), and then fit a magnetic boiler filter (to catch this heating sludge). In hard water areas affected by limescale, you can also add a limescale reducing filter.

My boiler engineer thinks it’s the PCB causing the E163 fault code to be displayed, does this seem right


Any fault that’s electrical, could be related to the boiler’s printed circuit board (PCB). It’s the PCB that gives and receives signals from the NTC sensor, but all other electronic components in your boiler too. So, if you have any electrical problem, the PCB needs to be ruled out as the culprit.

And, like testing the NTC sensor, it’s easy to do. Your boiler engineer needs to test the PCB using a multi-meter to check it’s getting power. If the power is weak or non-existent, it’s likely a replacement PCB is going to be needed, to clear the E163 fault code on your Potterton boiler.

If I need a new PCB, how much is a replacement going to cost


The overall cost of a replacement is going to depend on the boiler you have, and therefore, the PCB you need. Typically, this is the most expensive boiler repair. So, expect to pay in the region of £400-£500.

Other Potterton boiler issues


For more boiler issues regarding the Potterton Boiler then please visit the Potterton Boiler Problems And Cures page.