Potterton Boiler E133 Fault Code


The Potterton fault code E133 gas supply issue Q & A or require an engineer for an emergency boiler repair.


The Potterton Boiler Fault Code E133 Error Common Q & A


Just below, we have a list of common questions relating to the E133 fault code on the Potterton boiler.

Potterton Boiler E133 Fault Code

  • What does the E133 fault code mean on my Potterton boiler?
  • Is my boiler dangerous if it has a gas supply issue?
  • If I reset my boiler it works for a few minutes, then locks out, what is the problem?
  • Are there any basic checks we can do to see if this is a gas supply issue?
  • What can cause a gas supply issue?
  • What needs to be done to check the gas supply to the boiler and meter?
  • What problems can occur with the gas valve?
  • Can a faulty gas valve be fixed?
  • If I need a new gas valve in my Potterton boiler, how much is it likely to cost?
  • What has the PCB got to do with a gas supply issue?
  • If I need a new PCB, how much is it likely to cost?

What does the E133 fault code mean on my Potterton boiler


All modern Potterton boilers have a fault code system. When a problem occurs, the boiler’s printed circuit board (PCB) selects the most probable cause of the fault and converts that to a fault code.

This is then shown on the display panel. That’s going to make it easier and quicker for your emergency boiler engineer to find and fix the fault, which saves time and money.

In the case of the E133 fault code, the problem is most likely a gas supply issue.

Is my boiler dangerous if it has a gas supply issue


Your boiler should have locked out before displaying a fault code. This lockout is a safety function. A boiler that continues to operate with the current gas supply fault, could be dangerous.

So, if your boiler hasn’t locked out, switch off your gas supply, and the appliance. Call and emergency Gas Safe engineer to come and inspect your boiler and fix the problem.

If I reset my boiler it works for a few minutes, then locks out, what is the problem


Sometimes you can trick your boiler into thinking a problem is fixed, with a quick reset. But, as soon as the PCB notices the problem is still present, it will lock out the boiler.

And, it’s certainly not advisable to keep resetting your boiler. The E133 fault code relates to a gas issue, and that could be potentially dangerous.

Your boiler engineer will be able to fix the problem, and only then will they reset your boiler for you.

Are there any basic checks we can do to see if this is a gas supply issue


The most obvious check (and recommended by Potterton), is to check whether other gas appliances are working. So, if you have a gas fire or gas hob, check to see if they are working.

If they are working, it doesn’t completely rule out a gas supply issue. But if a hob, fire and boiler aren’t working, it’s almost certain that the gas supply is what’s causing the issue.

What can cause a gas supply issue


Looking at the root cause of the problem, your boiler engineer will first check the supply to the:

  • Boiler
  • Gas meter

If there’s no problem here, they’ll move onto the:

  • Gas valve
  • Burner
  • PCB

What needs to be done to check the gas supply to the boiler and meter


You’ll need a Gas Safe engineer to run a pressure test at both the meter and the boiler. If one or the other is showing a weak gas pressure, then that’s where the problem is.

It’s rare that gas pressure issues suddenly occur, unless there’s a problem with the supply from the utility provider. However, in colder months, it’s likely that the meter’s regulator has frozen.

If your meter is exposed to the elements, you’ll want to get someone to box it in, as well as lag it. This will stop the gas meter’s regulator freezing in future.

What problems can occur with the gas valve


Now the engineer has checked the supply of gas to the appliance is sufficient, they’ll need to open the boiler, by removing the case.

The gas valve is the component that controls the supply of gas into the burner. If there’s a fault here, the flame in the burner is going to be weak, fluctuating, or not present.

Gas valves are moving parts. And, like all moving parts, they can seize up. That’s going to mean that they might not be opening fully. So, when your boiler needs elevated levels of gas, the valve isn’t allowing it into the burner.

And, there can sometimes be some communications errors between the gas valve and PCB. The PCB gives signals to the gas valve to open and close. So, if the connections are damaged or loose, there’s a chance that the gas valve isn’t receiving those signals; it’s not opening and closing when it should be.

Can a faulty gas valve be fixed


If the overall condition of the valve is good, your boiler engineer will be able to fix it.

If it’s sticking, they’ll be able to free it up. And, if the connections between the gas valve and PCB are poor, they’ll be able to secure them, as well as check/replace faulty wiring.

If I need a new gas valve in my Potterton boiler, how much is it likely to cost

But, if the gas valve is in poor condition, it’s likely they’ll suggest a replacement over a repair. There’s little point spending time and money fixing an old and worn gas valve, when it could fail just weeks down the line.


The gas valve isn’t a cheap part to replace. Typically, we’d expect a new valve to cost in the region of £300 including parts and labour.

But, that’s the average cost. The exact cost will depend on the model of boiler you own.

What has the PCB got to do with a gas supply issue


Any fault code can be connected to the PCB. It’s the PCB that determines what the exact fault is, and then matches that fault with the most relevant fault code. So, if the PCB is faulty, then it could be displaying the wrong fault code.

Typically, if you’ve noticed your boiler acting strangely, the PCB could be to blame. When the PCB is at fault you might notice things like:

  • ontrol and display panel works intermittently
  • Boiler cycles on and off at random
  • Radiators or hot water don’t get up to temperature

If you want to get your boiler engineer to check your PCB, all they’ll need a multi-meter. Using a multi-meter and visually checking wiring and connections, they’ll be able to determine if there are any issues with the PCB.

If I need a new PCB, how much is it likely to cost


A PCB for your Potterton boiler could cost as much as £500. If you do need a new PCB, it’s worth having your boiler engineer checking all other expensive components too.

If you need a PCB and even one other expensive boiler component (gas valve, heat exchanger, pump etc), then it might be worth considering a replacement, complete with a long warranty.

Other Potterton boiler issues


For more boiler issues regarding the Potterton Boiler then please visit the Potterton Boiler Problems And Cures page.